75+ Quotes & Tweets: Canadians Against Bill C-48 & Bill C-69

75+ Quotes & Tweets: Canadians Against Bill C-48 & Bill C-69

Bill C-48 (west coast oil tanker moratorium) and Bill C-69 (change of review process for natural resource and infrastructure projects) have proven to be two of the most controversial bills to be introduced in parliament in recent years.

Both bills have been widely scrutinized by industry leaders and business gurus across the country, with it being said that they together will be the bane of Canada’s oil and gas industry while making it impossible for new resource development projects to get built across the country.


Our Natural Resource Sector Benefits All Canadians

If you didn’t know, the natural resource sector – energy, metals / mining and forestry - was responsible for (Natural Resources Canada):

  • 17% of Canada’s gross domestic product (GDP) in 2017
  • 1.82 million direct and indirect jobs across the country in 2017
  • 47% of Canada's total value of merchandise exports – at $236 billion worth in 2017
  • $22 billion annually in government revenues between 2012 and 2016

In short, this sector is a critical piece of the national economy and the backbone of our prosperity. Revenues from natural resource development not only support the private sector, but also the public that go towards the construction and development of hospitals, schools, roads and everything in between.


Canadian Leaders Say No to Bills C-48 & C-69

With these few facts in mind, you can see why many Canadians are concerned about the far-reaching, detrimental effects that Bill C-48 and Bill C-69 are expected to have on the country (and are already having in some provinces). But don’t take our word for it. Hear from these industry leaders and business gurus yourself, both in newspapers and from the recent senate hearings across the country concerning these dangerous bills.

We’ve collected and compiled several quotes and tweets from many Canadians in many different industries and positions across the country concerning Bill C-48 and Bill C-69. We then encourage you to ask yourself the question: are these pieces of legislation good for Canada?


Elaine McCoy, Canadian Senator

[Bill C-48] unfairly inhibits the capacity of three provinces to fully develop their natural resources. It effectively landlocks much of our energy resources, preventing future infrastructure development and frustrating the aspirations of several indigenous communities.”

Source: Calgary Herald



Roy Fox, Chief of the Blood Tribe

“I understand that the regulatory approval process as it stands in Canada is flawed. But Bill C-69, as it is written, just makes that process worse. It jeopardizes and sabotages future resource development by opening projects up to inevitable court challenges.”

Source: Calgary Herald



Denise Batters, Canadian Senator

“Bill C-69… will decimate our western resource industries and cripple the Canadian economy.”

Source: Canada Action



Calvin Helin, President & Chairman, Eagle Spirit Energy

“First Nations have a right to say what happens in their traditional territories. This ban involves half of the B.C. coast line. It extends from the Alaskan border to the north end of Vancouver Island. It’s like B.C. saying they have a right to say what’s going on in Quebec.”

Source: BNN Bloomberg



Grant Bishop, Associate Director, C.D. Howe Institute

“We believe that, in its present form, Bill C-69 risks amplifying political risk and further impairing confidence in Canada’s resource sectors. It also doesn’t address Ottawa’s past failures to adequately consult Indigenous peoples, which resulted in the Federal Court of Appeal quashing cabinet’s approvals of the Northern Gateway and Trans Mountain expansion pipeline.”

Source: The Globe and Mail



Paula Simons, Canadian Senator

“A lot of people on every side feel that there is a lack of clarity in the wording of the bill about what projects go on the project list for evaluation, about how we balance economic impacts versus social and environmental impacts and about the power of the minister to step in and trump whatever non-partisan, apolitical regulatory process is supposed to be. And I’m hearing that across the board.”

Source: Global News



Michael MacDonald, Canadian Senator

“We heard that Bill C-69 will entrench regulatory gridlock… We heard this legislation will diminish Canada’s competitiveness, drive away investment, destroy tens of thousands of middle-class jobs, and lose tax and royalty revenue.”

Source: The Chronicle Herald



Bronwyn Eyre, Saskatchewan Energy & Resources Minister

“With Bill C-69 we really would be seeing no major pipeline project approvals ever in Canada.”

Source: BNN Bloomberg



Stephen Buffalo, President & CEO, Indian Resource Council

“We need more jobs available for our people. We need them to earn good wages – wages that can support their families. Right now, Bill C-48 and other policies threaten all of that for us.”

Source: Edmonton Journal



Greg Rickford, Ontario Energy, Mines, Northern Development & Indigenous Affairs Minister

The Government of Ontario is concerned that Bill C-69 “will grind natural resource development in our country to a halt.”

Source: Financial Post



Kevin Neveu, President & CEO, Precision Drilling

“I’m concerned that Bill C-69 is an extremely complex, far-reaching bill that will complicate [natural resource project] approvals [in Canada].”

Source: BNN Bloomberg



Peter Tertzakian, Executive Director, ARC Energy Research Institute

“Bill C-48, I sense, living in Alberta particularly, is antagonistic and divisive in extreme ways that really I haven’t seen before. The combined effects of these points are demonstrably contributing towards civil instability between provinces, threatening the fabric of Canada’s federation.”

Source: Twitter, @sjmuir



Grant Bishop, Associate Director, C.D. Howe Institute

“Bill C-69 will mean that every project that triggers federal assessment will face a subjective, political decision. This is because Bill C-69 removes the “significant adverse environmental effects” threshold before requiring a political “justification” decision by the federal cabinet.”

Source: The Globe and Mail



Sarah Vandaiyar, President & CEO, Young Pipelines Association of Canada

“Legislation such as Bill C-69 reduces the competitiveness of the industry, which in turn, diminishes the entrepreneurship, passion and drive that exists in young Canadians to continue to make the industry better.”

Source: Young Pipeliners Association of Canada



Rafi Tahmazian, Director & Senior Portfolio Manager, Canoe Financial

“You’ve got a government that is creating massive layers of regulation. They’re creating regulators that are not independent, they are creating regulators and regulations that are built off their ideology, and Bill C-69 is going to further smother us.”

Source: BNN Bloomberg



Brett Wilson, Chairman of Canoe Financial

I’m terrified of Bill C-69… [because of] the odds of it slowing down the process. It’s sheer lunacy in terms of what Bill C-69 is trying to do.

Source: BNN Bloomberg



Martha Hall Findlay, President & CEO, Canada West Foundation

“Why a ban on specific tanker traffic along a specific section of Canada’s West Coast, when there are no similar bans on any traffic along any other Canadian coastline? What differentiates the northern West Coast from other Canadian shores?”

Source: The Globe and Mail



Richard Neufeld, Canadian Senator

“Without tankers, there can be no pipeline. There are no oil-tanker moratoriums in the entire world. If this bill passes, Canada would have the only one.”

Source: Financial Post



Doug Black, Canadian Senator

“We’re not happy with the fact of the so called Bill C-69, which redoes the way resource projects are approved in this country, which effectively means if we don’t get this right, we run the risk of having no major resource projects approved in this country, because nobody is going to apply.”

Source: Global News



Roy Fox, Chief of the Blood Tribe

“…a false impression exists – that Alberta First Nations unanimously support Bill C-69… I and the majority of Treaty 7 chiefs strong oppose the bill for its likely devastating impact on our ability to support our community members, as it would make it virtually impossible for my nation to fully benefit from the development of our energy resources.”

Source: The Globe and Mail



Elaine McCoy, Canadian Senator

[Bill C-48] allows the government to exempt, arbitrarily, any number of oil tankers from the ban. It does nothing to address other marine traffic like cargo ships, ferries and cruise ships that pose spill risks and have, in fact, caused damage to coastal communities.”

Source: Calgary Herald



Richard Neufeld, Canadian Senator

“Bill C-69 (along with government bills C-48 and C-68) will further erode Canada’s competitiveness in terms of attracting capital into our resource development sector. It threatens the very fabric of our Canadian prosperity.”

Source: Alaska Highway News



Rafi Tahmazian, Director & Senior Portfolio Manager, Canoe Financial

“No business in its right mind is going to go through all the efforts and the money spent to try to build a facility and an infrastructure when this black box, Bill C-69, which is so ambiguous, is hanging out there…”

Source: BNN Bloomberg



Doug Black, Canadian Senator

“Bill C-69 creates incredible uncertainty because… I could go on for hours… but it’s just so complicated, so expensive and so uncertain, that if you want to develop a pipeline… a new port expansion in Vancouver or Halifax, you’re going to say “it’s too uncertain, I can’t do that!”

Source: Global News



Calvin Helin, President & Chairman, Eagle Spirit Energy

“There was an absolute total lack of consultation [on Bill C-48]… various ministers and government people flew in and made an announcement that they’re doing this.”

Source: BNN Bloomberg



Martha Hall Findlay, President & CEO, Canada West Foundation

“…[Bill C-48] is frankly unCanadian in clearly favouring some regions over others. It would jeopardize economic activity in one part of the country while ignoring even greater and arguably riskier tanker activity in many other parts of Canada.”

Source: Edmonton Journal



Stephen Buffalo, President & CEO, Indian Resource Council

“…the proposed Bill C-48 and Bill C-69 as they currently stand… continues to prevent indigenous Canadians from responsibly developing our resources and receiving full value for them.”

Source: Indian Resource Council



Martha Hall Findlay, President & CEO, Canada West Foundation

“The main problem with this ban is that it would prevent Canadian oil from getting to Asian markets via, for example, the deep-water ports of Kitimat or Prince Rupert – and thus directly hurt the Albertan economy and Alberta jobs. It is, in large measure, the work of an anti-oil sands lobby run amok.”

Source: The Globe and Mail



Doug Black, Canadian Senator

“…the minister responsible for all the approvals in Bill C-69 is the Minister of the Environment – not Finance, not Industry, not Energy, it’s the Minister of the Environment – because the environmental movement in large part funded by interests outside this country, have “captured the flag.”

Source: EnergyNow Media



Calvin Helin, President & Chairman, Eagle Spirit Energy

”In the chief’s view, this whole process [Bill C-48] is kind of a sham that’s being rammed down the local First Nations throats by a government who is bowing to the green movement rather than a touted reconciliation agenda.”

Source: BNN Bloomberg



Elaine McCoy, Canadian Senator

”We’re told that banning oil tankers off the B.C. coast will protect the area’s unique ecosystem and preserve the economic livelihoods of coastal fishing communities. Unfortunately, there is little evidence to support this claim.”

Source: Calgary Herald



Richard Neufeld, Canadian Senator

“While some have coined C-69 as the “no more pipelines bill,” this bill is about much more than pipelines and the oil and gas industry… this bill will affect our economy as a whole and touches on nearly all facets of major infrastructure projects and resource development in Canada.”

Source: Financial Post



Martha Hall Findlay, President & CEO, Canada West Foundation

“We’ve done an awful lot of work with an awful lot of investors… there’s some who say if we hadn’t had our project approved already, we wouldn’t’ even bother under C-69 because they view this as being even worse than what we have in terms of certainty.”

Source: BNN Bloomberg



Elaine McCoy, Canadian Senator

[Bill C-48] threatens national unity severely and significantly by pitting one region against another and communities against communities.”

Source: Calgary Herald



Sarah Vandai  yar, President & CEO, Young Pipelines Association of Canada

“…the uncertainty in the regulator process creates roadblocks to realizing opportunities to develop Canadian resources, the revenue from which will support a transition to a low-carbon future.”

Source: Young Pipeliners Association of Canada



Doug Black, Canadian Senator

“The reality is, under this proposed legislation [Bill C-69]… we’re hearing from companies that would be natural proponents to develop the Canadian natural resource industry simply saying, “We’re not even going to apply.”

Source: BNN Bloomberg



Martha Hall Findlay, President & CEO, Canada West Foundation

“If Bill C-69 is passed, replacing the National Energy Board will take a long time – and the pipeline would then be much more delayed.”

Source: The Globe and Mail



Richard Neufeld, Canadian Senator

“Bill C-48 is an extreme and unprecedented piece of legislation. And make no mistake, Indigenous communities are angry about it.”

Source: Financial Post



Say NO to Bill C-69


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